Getting worked

What a wonderful feeling to get tossed by a large wave, your body twisting completely around until it’s slammed backwards into the beach. 

It was a feeling I’d almost forgotten, “getting worked.” It reminded me of being a teenage ski bum, losing an edge and hurtling down a steep slope or overturning a kayak in a river. It had been years.

After crawling my way up the sand somewhat breathless it was time to go. We gathered our magazines and beach umbrella and started picking our way through the hundred thousand glistening bodies that lay between us and 98th street, Rockaway.

Going to a New York beach is a very different experience from the West Coast where I grew up. Here, people like to be near each other. Towels, umbrellas and coolers, concessions, life guards and popsicle carts. There are no joggers. No real swimmers. Just thousands of bodies getting battered by the surf in unison. Sometimes paddle ball. 

I took a video once from the top of the Coney Island Ferris Wheel of the beach below where it looks like some incredible animal migration. A million penguins alighting on an Antarctic ice sheet or eight hundred thousand wildebeests crossing the Okavongo Delta. 

feetin2worlds
feetin2worlds:

Join us on August 26 for ‘Coming to the Table: Immigrant Women and Food’

Celebrate immigrant women and ethnic food traditions. Taste foods from Haiti, Bangladesh, Jordan, and other nations. Learn how immigrant women support their families, create community and maintain culture in a new country—through cooking, growing, selling, shopping for, and serving food.

A discussion with: 
Grace Young, award-winning cookbook author (Stir Frying to the Sky’s Edge, The Breath of a Wok, The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen)

Nadege Fleurimond, chef and author, owner of Fleurimond Catering 

Jessica Chakraborty, community & culinary manager, The League of Kitchens

Barbara Sibley, chef and owner, La Palapa Cocina Mexicana

Moderated by: 
Von Diaz, journalist and food writer

RSVP here: https://comingtothetable.eventbrite.com

feetin2worlds:

Join us on August 26 for ‘Coming to the Table: Immigrant Women and Food’

Celebrate immigrant women and ethnic food traditions. Taste foods from Haiti, Bangladesh, Jordan, and other nations. Learn how immigrant women support their families, create community and maintain culture in a new country—through cooking, growing, selling, shopping for, and serving food.

A discussion with:
Grace Young, award-winning cookbook author (Stir Frying to the Sky’s Edge, The Breath of a Wok, The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen)

Nadege Fleurimond, chef and author, owner of Fleurimond Catering

Jessica Chakraborty, community & culinary manager, The League of Kitchens

Barbara Sibley, chef and owner, La Palapa Cocina Mexicana

Moderated by:
Von Diaz, journalist and food writer

RSVP here: https://comingtothetable.eventbrite.com

dailyoverview
dailyoverview:

Cape Town Overview Tour (2/7)
7/29/2014
Joe Slovo Informal Settlement
Cape Town, South Africa
33°57′07″S 18°32′03″E
Joe Slovo is an informal settlement in Langa, Cape Town, named for the Anti-Apartheid activist, and close friend of Nelson Mandela. Its residents (20,000+) have been engaged in a 15-year battle with the government over forced evictions, and have taken the matter all the way to the Constitutional Court, the highest in the land. It is estimated that 26% of households in six metropolitan areas live in similar shantytowns with extremely limited access to services. The contrast between these and neighboring suburbs is often a compelling reminder of the inequality that plagues the fledgling democracy.
www.overv.eu

dailyoverview:

Cape Town Overview Tour (2/7)

7/29/2014

Joe Slovo Informal Settlement

Cape Town, South Africa

33°57′07″S 18°32′03″E

Joe Slovo is an informal settlement in Langa, Cape Town, named for the Anti-Apartheid activist, and close friend of Nelson Mandela. Its residents (20,000+) have been engaged in a 15-year battle with the government over forced evictions, and have taken the matter all the way to the Constitutional Court, the highest in the land. It is estimated that 26% of households in six metropolitan areas live in similar shantytowns with extremely limited access to services. The contrast between these and neighboring suburbs is often a compelling reminder of the inequality that plagues the fledgling democracy.

www.overv.eu