Ali Mazrui, a scholar and prolific author who set off a tsunami of criticism in 1986 by writing and hosting “The Africans: A Triple Heritage,” a public television series that culminated in what seemed to be an endorsement of African nations’ acquiring nuclear weapons, died on Oct. 12 at his home in Vestal, N.Y. He was 81.
(via Evangelist Len Lindstrom’s African gold mining venture fails - Saskatchewan - CBC News)

I tried hard to get an interview with Lindstrom in Monrovia back in January but he kept evading me in the most sunny, personable manner possible. I guess he was worried about all the people he duped back in Canada finding out. 

Basically, a Canadian televangelist convinced his followers to invest large amounts of money on a speculative gold field in a remote part of Liberia. Turns out he was super naive, losing his mining rights to official corruption and incredible bumbling on his part. I really hope this becomes a made for TV CBC feature movie.

(via Evangelist Len Lindstrom’s African gold mining venture fails - Saskatchewan - CBC News)

I tried hard to get an interview with Lindstrom in Monrovia back in January but he kept evading me in the most sunny, personable manner possible. I guess he was worried about all the people he duped back in Canada finding out.

Basically, a Canadian televangelist convinced his followers to invest large amounts of money on a speculative gold field in a remote part of Liberia. Turns out he was super naive, losing his mining rights to official corruption and incredible bumbling on his part. I really hope this becomes a made for TV CBC feature movie.

My friend Ashoka is back online after a battle with Ebola. Feeling mighty relieved. Still thinking about Liberia though. We need to send more healthcare, and fast. 

Troh is now in a house at the edge of the city, along with her younger son, who is thirteen, and two other people. At first, they were ordered, under penalty of arrest, to stay in the apartment where Duncan had been so ill, amid his dirty sheets, the table he’d sat at, the dishes he’d used. Armed guards were outside. It took a couple of days for the realization to set in that this was neither fair nor sensible, unless the city wanted to increase the chances of four more cases. Even then, there were delays in finding a cleaner place for them to stay; Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins eventually drove them, himself, to a home donated by someone described as a “faith friend” of his.

An Ebola Death in Dallas, and a Dog in Spain - The New Yorker

So a good Samaritan judge was the one who rescued Duncan’s family from isolation in a cramped, infected apartment both legally, and physically. That is not a good system.

agrammar

The Rules of the Game: A Fuller Thought on J. Hopper and Vampire Weekend

agrammar:

Yesterday I posted a fairly peeved note concerning Jessica Hopper’s Chicago Reader article about Vampire Weekend. (She’s responded to that note, very graciously, on her blog, but that seems to have vanished.) My note led to a spike in traffic, which was unexpected: if I’d realized it’d catch much attention, I might have explained myself more carefully. The essay below is an attempt to outline my thoughts beyond the mere pique of the thing. Some of you may have heard me talk about this stuff before, but it seemed worth setting down a full, coherent version of it; read at your leisure.

Let me note first, though, that the point here is not to snipe at Hopper, whose work I enjoy. More importantly, the issue I’m about to outline is not really about the music of Vampire Weekend. I do not need you to like their music. But I do want you to think about the culture of our criticism, because I feel like it’s ever more beholden to a kind of blind posturing that wants to stop it from saying anything useful or true. Let’s go ahead and call this posturing The Game.

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